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Sub-Forum Making a Living
Topic Workamping Resources
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Workamping Resources
Total Views: 5004 - Total Replies: 14
Mar 24 2009, 4:49 pm - By LiveWorkDream


rene workamping on organic farmWe discovered workamping was a great way to extend our full-time RVing sabbatical road trip.

Many RVers think workamping means cleaning toilets at the state park, but we've worked on a Florida organic farm, managed a New Mexico hot springs resort, and helped out on a Colorado guest ranch.

But is workamping right for you? Here are a few resources for workamping and camp-host opportunities...
Please add more here if you know of any other sites with workamping resources!
Working and Living Our Dream Life
LiveWorkDream Fulltime RVing Blog
Apr 02 2009, 2:44 pm - Replied by: Emmymau


We've considered doing this as well.  I'm told that a long (6 months or more) commitment is frequently involved, which doesn't always work for us.  Have you found that to be the case?
1995 National RV Dolphin 533--the Incorrigible
1993 Ford Ranger--not yet named
Mushroom--the ship's cat
http://www.elepent.com

Apr 02 2009, 3:09 pm - Replied by: LiveWorkDream


Many locations do want a long commitment, because they don't want to have to find new workampers all the time. But kind jobs are to be had.

Our longest gig anywhere so far was 3 1/2 months where we worked on the guest ranch in Colorado. The people were great, the place was beautiful, and this job paid, so it was well worth it and time flew by.

We worked/volunteered for just a couple weeks at an animal rescue, but that was because we were fed up with cleaning cat cages. On the organic farm in Florida we worked about two months, and that was about the same time we worked at the Hot Springs resort. The latter was three days on / three off, so the hours made up for it. But we noticed they are currently advertising again, and requiring the six month commitment you originally mentioned.

If you find a job that might sound good, try to negotiate the duration. It's fair to at least commit to a month. But I think two months is about the longest I would ever workamp again, unless it was a really sweet deal.

And while its not exactly a nice thing to do, you always have the option of leaving if a workamping job doesn't work out.
Working and Living Our Dream Life
Apr 03 2009, 2:47 pm - Replied by: Emmymau


It sounds like we're on a similar schedule as you: 1-2 months in a place, more if it's really nice.

Did you find the animal rescue and organic farm jobs through the workamping sites as well?  I thought workamping was pretty solidly limited to RV park jobs.

1995 National RV Dolphin 533--the Incorrigible
1993 Ford Ranger--not yet named
Mushroom--the ship's cat
http://www.elepent.com

Apr 03 2009, 3:09 pm - Replied by: LiveWorkDream


The majority of jobs on the Workamper site are your typical campground host type gigs, but we did find the Animal Rescue, Hot Springs Resort, and Guest Ranch jobs there. The farm stay we found on the Woofers Website.
Working and Living Our Dream Life
Apr 04 2009, 3:14 am - Replied by: Emmymau


Many thanks!
1995 National RV Dolphin 533--the Incorrigible
1993 Ford Ranger--not yet named
Mushroom--the ship's cat
http://www.elepent.com

May 11 2009, 5:31 pm - Replied by: Technomadia


Has anyone had any experiences with joining Workamping.com? 

It seems if you want to post your resume, you have to be a plus member at $37/yr.  However, my concern is that they also charge employers $97/yr to post their job listings. With both potential candidates and employers paying to post, does that lead to decent number of postings?

We're currently considering trying out workamping, if the conditions are right for us. As we run a tech consulting business, we need to have good cellular connection, for example. And we're also not comfortable committing to a long term gig of more than a couple months.   Mainly, we just want to put ourselves out there and see if we get any nibbles and evaluate from there.. and gain the experience if something manifests.

So.. is paying the $37 for Workamper.com worth it just to see if we get nibbles? Or, the  more accurate question, are there enough nibbles there to merit the cost?

Thanks,
 - Cherie

Cherie and Chris / Technomads / www.technomadia.com
1961 GM 4106 - Vintage Bus
On the road since 2006 

May 12 2009, 1:39 am - Replied by: Emmymau


In our thus far brief experience, yes.  We signed up as the season was changing (early April) and saw 10+ new postings daily, as well as receiving four cold-call offers based solely on our resume on the site. 

Things seem to have slowed down now, though obviously since we found a position I haven't been checking it regularly, but there still seem to be new positions popping up, albeit at a slower rate. 

1995 National RV Dolphin 533--the Incorrigible
1993 Ford Ranger--not yet named
Mushroom--the ship's cat
http://www.elepent.com

May 12 2009, 3:29 am - Replied by: LiveWorkDream


We found our best workamping gigs were well worth the subscription fee!
Working and Living Our Dream Life
Apr 11 2010, 1:53 pm - Replied by: Seeria


Might also looking to work exchanges like WWOOF http://www.wwoof.org/

or HELPx  http://helpx.net

They're similar to each other, offering ways to hook up with people or farms that need assistance for brief (or long) periods. In exchange they give you room/lot space and food. Definitely work out ahead what hours they want and what  you get, like electric hookup, dumping abilities, as well as food--communal in their house or do you get to pick your own fresh foods and make it yourself. Not all have space for RVs so be sure to check.

Apr 13 2010, 4:03 pm - Replied by: LiveWorkDream


Great idea! We found our farm job through WOOF. I didn't know about Helpx though, thanks.
Working and Living Our Dream Life
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